Homer B The Wonderful Weaver--misc. grammar questions

This board is for discussion of Classical Writing - Homer. CW - Homer teaches writing, analysis, and imitation by working through longer narratives.

Homer B The Wonderful Weaver--misc. grammar questions

Postby ccinIdaho » Wed Apr 17, 2013 11:06 pm

Hello,

A number of little questions:
1. I noticed on the worksheets (pg 325) the first and fourth box have an extra space that the answer key doesn't fill in. Are the extra spaces for the relative clauses ("which she wove in her loom" and "which no one can do") but these aren't covered in Homer? In other words, is "which" a subordinate conjunction or are only adverbial conjunctions subordinate conjunctions?

2. For the parsing on pg 129 the answer key has "such" answering the question "what kind." Could it answer the question "which one"? Also, isn't its classification descriptive and not definitive?

3. Is "these" in the prep phrase "as these" a demonstrative pronoun and not a personal pronoun?

4. Could "try" of "to see her try" be a noun and not a verbal? It seems strange to say "I should like to see her to try."

5. On the first diagram (pg 130) is "all the world" suppose to be "all (of) the world" and thus diagrammed as "all" as the subject and "(of) the world" as a prepositional phrase?

6. Should "to see it" come off of "there"? It seems connected to "there" and not "was."

7. Should "weaving" be a curved line since isn't it a gerund?

8. Finally :roll: , what question does "for the contest" answer in relation to time? Is it "what kind"? I was wondering if it should go under came, answering "why."

Thank you so much!

C.C.
ccinIdaho
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 4:27 pm

Re: Homer B The Wonderful Weaver--misc. grammar questions

Postby admin » Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:29 am

1. The SW has a few extra blanks here and there. "Which" isn't a conjunction, definitely.

2. I really think that 'such' is talking about the quality of the skeins (what kind), and can't wrap my mind around a 'which one' intent -- I'd certainly entertain a good explanation, though, and consider it. When I replace it with synonyms, I end with with things like 'fabulous,exquisite, perfect', rather than 'this, that, these'. The classification is indeed descriptive.

3. Yes, demonstrative. (and the object of 'as', not 'of'.)

4. It does sound strange to add 'to' -- "I should like to see her to try", but the noun meanings just don't work. It's an infinitive which lost its 'to'.

5. It certainly seems that something is elided here ... but I'm not sure what. I'll see if Lene has any ideas.

6. No, 'to see it' should come off there. It's a phrase expressing 'why' all were there. It's not describing the 'there'.

7. If your convention is that all gerunds go on curved lines, then weaving should indeed be on a curved line. I think some sources do that. Since it's a gerund, I left the line straight.

8. "For the contest" -- I can't see that telling us 'why' the time came. It's more of a 'which one'. Which time came? The time for the contest.

Carolyn
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 6:21 pm

Re: Homer B The Wonderful Weaver--misc. grammar questions

Postby ccinIdaho » Thu Apr 18, 2013 12:56 pm

Thank you so much, Carolyn.

I still needed a little clarification on "there" and the "to see it" in the first diagram. Is "there" called a predicate adverb here? I'm unclear why "to see it" couldn't be an adverb to "there" and thus come off of it. It seems strange to me for "to see it" to be an adverb of "was." Was-why--to see it doesn't make sense to me.

Thanks again!
C.C.
ccinIdaho
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 4:27 pm

Re: Homer B The Wonderful Weaver--misc. grammar questions

Postby admin » Fri Apr 19, 2013 5:01 am

I'm racking my brain for a good example, but can't come up with one. What we need to find is either a purpose clause (like, 'to see it') modifying either a verb of state (was), or an adverb/prep phrase. I'll put my thinking cap on, and you do the same!

Carolyn
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 6:21 pm


Return to Book II: Homer --- Narrative Writing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron